Timey Wimey Stuff

When last we met, we were discussing transcendental pears. This is because it is easier by far then the topic of cross temporal tactics. But the more I thought about it, the more I realized that before I could get into tactics, I had to spend some time on parameters. Since I am using the Last Great Time War as my starting point, this means discussing the Laws of Time.

Which basically means I get to make a lot of stuff up. Despite the long history of Dr. Who, we know very little about the Laws of Time the Time Lords lived by. We do know they liked the past and future kept separate. Being in the same place more than once at a time is dangerous. If you doubt me, just watch Father’s Day.So right away, we take away a tactical option. There won’t be any fuguing, a’la Zelazny. You don’t get to summon half a dozen of yourself from out of time to fight with you. You get to be here once, and once only, so make it count.

Another thing, once you are involved with events, you aren’t allowed to move around inside them. There’s no nipping back to three hours ago to get the key you forgot, or snatching someone from the jaws of death. You can change locations all you want, but not your temporal coordinates.

We’re also told there are fixed points in time. Some events MUST happen. In human history, Pompeii is such an inevitable event (in Fires of Pompeii.), as is the first colonization attempt of Mars (in Waters of Mars.). The death of the Doctor counts, too (in The Wedding of River Song.). Tampering with such fixed points leads to consequences both cosmic and dire. Does this render certain races safe? Humanity has two such events it can call its own. Does that mean we are temporally unassailable until we go to Mars? Or can other races fill that gap?

So the Laws of Time in Doctor Who bear little resemblance to the Pirate’s Code. They aren’t merely guidelines. There are consequences to face, so both sides have to follow them. They can be bent. The Time Lords are able to let the Doctor meet his different incarnations more than once, but it wasn’t easy, and it wasn’t without risk.

What the Laws of Time we can extrapolate give us is a  timestream that is soft from the outside. One can move around in it and enter or leave it at will. Once you engage with  it, however, it is rigid and unforgiving. And as with most rigid things, it’s fragile. It can be damaged. Damage it too much and it will break altogether. Even entering it too often near the same place can damage it.

Outside, you can move freely, plan freely. You can even gather some intelligence, although precise data is rare. What you can’t do is change anything. Time plays around you like a movie, and you have the remote.  You can choose when to move, but once you come in, you’re committed. Succeed or fail, you have one chance.

So the stage is set. We know what the two sides need. We know what they can do, and more importantly what they can’t. When next we meet, we get dangerous.

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